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MPS conditions

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Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) conditions are a family of rare, life limiting lysosomal storage disorders that can affect both children and adults.

Mucopolysaccharides are long chains of sugar molecules used in the building of bones, cartilage, skin, tendons and many other tissues in the body. Usually there is a continuous recycling process of building new mucopolysaccharides and breaking down old ones.

For people with MPS diseases there is not enough of a particular enzyme to break down used mucopolysaccharides which means they build up and store in the cells in the body which causes progressive damage.

MPS I - Hurler, Hurler Scheie and Scheie

MPS I includes Hurler, Hurler-Scheie and Scheie diseases. These diseases differ in severity of symptoms across a spectrum and are named after the doctors that identified them.

MPS II Hunter

MPS II, known as Hunter disease, is one of the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. MPS II was first identified by Dr Hunter in 1917 and includes a spectrum of symptoms from mild to severe.

MPS III Sanfilippo

MPS III, known as Sanfilippo disease, is one of the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. MPS III was first identified by Dr Sanfilippo in 1963 and includes 4 different types A, B, C and D.

MPS IV Morquio

MPS IV, known as Morquio disease, is one of the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. MPS IV disease was first identified by Dr Morquio in 1929 and includes 2 different types A and B. 

MPS VI - Maroteaux-Lamy

MPS VI, known as Maroteaux-Lamy disease, is one of the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. MPS VI was first identified by Dr Maroteaux and Dr Lamy in 1963.

MPS VII - Sly

MPS VII, known as Sly disease, is one of the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. MPS VII was first identified by Dr Sly in 1972 and includes a spectrum of symptoms from mild to severe.

MPS IX – Natowicz

MPS IX, known as Natowicz disease, is one of the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. MPS IX was first noted in 1996.